American actor Samuel L. Jackson travels to Africa to meet his relatives in Gabon

By Halligan Agade American actor and film producer Samuel L. Jackson has traced his ancestry through Finding Your Roots, an American docu-series that uses traditional genealogical research and genetics to discover the family history of celebrities.American actor Samuel L. Jackson travels to Africa to meet his relatives in Gabon. The Hollywood veteran found discovered his roots to the Bantu tribe in the West African nation … Continue reading American actor Samuel L. Jackson travels to Africa to meet his relatives in Gabon

The beauty and the importance of the W.E.B. Dubois Memorial Centre for Pan African Culture

By NAYABA ARINDE

Set on a beautiful campus in the bustling heart of Accra, Ghana, is the inspirational W.E.B. DuBois Centre for Pan African Culture, which was dedicated on June 22, 1985.

A proud bust of DuBois surveys the peaceful green and plant-filled grounds.

Locals, tourists and relocated foreign residents descend upon this expansive and embracing campus to learn about and feel the energy of this world renowned Pan Africanist scholar, innovator, publisher and avid writer. Continue reading “The beauty and the importance of the W.E.B. Dubois Memorial Centre for Pan African Culture”

Watch the exciting moment African-American women officially became registered voters in Ghana [Video]

By Etsey Atisu

African Americans who have traced their ancestral roots to Ghana, and those living in Ghana with the hope of becoming citizens, have received another boost in their desires after they successfully received final documentation that officially makes them registered voters.

https://youtu.be/Y0LNQHLOKzQ Continue reading “Watch the exciting moment African-American women officially became registered voters in Ghana [Video]”

50 African-Americans meet the Oba of Benin during their journey of rediscovery

50 Americans who traced their origin to Benin Kingdom have visited have visited the Palace of the Omo N’Oba N’Edo Uku Akpolokpolo, the Oba of Benin, Oba Ewuare II.

While welcoming the Americans, Oba Ewuare II commended them for making effort to trace their roots back home and thanked the ancestors for protecting them in their sojourn. Continue reading “50 African-Americans meet the Oba of Benin during their journey of rediscovery”

50 African Americans Arrive Nigerian city of Benin to trace ancestry

50 African-American have arrived the Nigerian city of Benin on a mission to trace their ancestry.  The tourists, arrived Benin from California, United States of America (USA), and were entertained by the Benin Cultural Troupe as well as been treated to delicious local African dishes, including palm oil fruits soup (banga), blended vegetable (black) soup, owo soup, pounded yam and agidi (corncake) among others. Continue reading “50 African Americans Arrive Nigerian city of Benin to trace ancestry”

Seventy African-Americans trace their roots to Oyo Kingdom in Nigeria

By Bode Durojaiye

Seventy African-Americans have traced their ancestral lineage to the ancient town of Oyo, Nigeria and were feted at a reception organised in their honor at the Palace of the Alaafin of Oyo. Oba Lamidi Olayiwola Adeyemi 111. The monarch used to the occasion to call on the Nigerian government embark on re-integrating Yorubas across the globe back to their ancestral roots.  Continue reading “Seventy African-Americans trace their roots to Oyo Kingdom in Nigeria”

A Visitor in My Homelands: Too African for the U.S. and Too American for Nigeria

My relationship to my ancestral home is complicated yet precious.

By Itoro Udofia

People often assume I was not born and raised in the United States. As a child of Nigerian immigrants bearing an indigenous name, and with features etched from another land, I have never felt like I fully belong here.

But I’ve also had difficulty fitting in with my Nigerian origins. Continue reading “A Visitor in My Homelands: Too African for the U.S. and Too American for Nigeria”

Why an African American Free Masons group “returned” to one of slave trade’s darkest places

By Joy Notoma

When a group of Prince Hall Masons from North Carolina arrived in Cotonou, Benin last month for the inauguration of a new grand lodge in Cotonou, the cultural significance wasn’t lost on the masons from Benin.

After The American Revolutionary War (1775-83), a formerly enslaved man from Massachusetts who had fought in the war for independence, was attracted to Freemason ideals like brotherly love, justice, and liberty, but the exclusively white group wouldn’t allow a black man in its ranks. The man, Prince Hall, wasn’t one to take no for an answer, though.

With all the traditional tenets of masonry, he decided to start his own group of masons.

Continue reading “Why an African American Free Masons group “returned” to one of slave trade’s darkest places”